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Consign - Mannlicher - 8x57 JS - M95M Sporterized - Wd/Bl, 23.5"Barrel

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Regular Price:
$750.00
Your Price:
$500.00 (You save $250.00)
SKU:
40352
Current Stock:
1
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Product Description


Used Gun Condition :: Good ::

A rating of :: Good :: indicates that the firearm appears to be in proper working condition but may show signs of mechanical and/or cosmetic wear.

 - Made in Budapest

The Mannlicher M1895 (German: Infanterie Repetier-Gewehr M.95HungarianGyalogsági IsmétlÅ‘ Puska M95; "Infantry Repeating-Rifle M95") is a bolt-action rifle, designed by Ferdinand Ritter von Mannlicher that used a refined version of his revolutionary straight-pull action bolt, much like the Mannlicher M1890 carbine. It was nicknamed the Ruck-Zu(rü)ck (German slang for "back and forth") by Austrian troops and "Ta-Pum" by Italian troops who even wrote a song about it during World War I.

It was initially adopted and employed by the Austro-Hungarian Army throughout World War I, and retained post-war by both the Austrian and Hungarian armies. The main foreign user was Bulgaria, which, starting in 1903, acquired large numbers and continued using them throughout both Balkan and World Wars. After Austria-Hungary's defeat in World War I, many were given to other Balkan states as war reparations. A number of these rifles also saw use in World War II, particularly by second line, reservist, and partisan units in Romania, Yugoslavia, Italy, and to lesser degree, Germany. Post war many were sold as cheap surplus, with some finding their way to the hands of African guerrillas in the 1970s[citation needed] and many more being exported to the United States as sporting and collectible firearms. The M1895 bolt also served as an almost exact template for the ill-fated Canadian M1905 Ross rifle, though the later M1910 used a complicated interrupted-thread instead of two solid lugs.