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Boker Plus - Tech Tool City 3 - 2.8" Blade - 12C27 - Black G10 Handle - 01BO803

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Price:
$64.99
SKU:
788857034446
Current Stock:
1
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Product Description

With the Boker Camp Knife, one of the forefathers of all modern multi-purpose pocket knives, our history began in the year 1869. After almost 150 years of successful market presence, the time came to convert this proven concept into a modern knife.  The modernized construction, which is based on solid steel liners, is embedded in two contoured handle scales, made out of black G10. The Swedish Sandvik 12C27 steel, with a Rockwell hardness of 58-60 HRC, provides outstanding edge retention of the hollow ground blade. The high quality manufacturing, with a smooth blade action and optimized operability, are proof of the premium quality of our Boker Plus Tech Tools. The hollow ground stainless steel blade is accompanied by these tools: Glass breaker, flat screwdriver with cap lifter and wire stripper, small serrated blade with flat screwdriver, cork screw, lanyard hole, scissors, stitching awl, clip.

  • Pocket Knife
  • 6.57 in
  • 2.80 in
  • 0.09 in
  • 4.16 oz
  • 12C27
  • G10
  • Nail Nick
  • Manual
  • Slipjoint
  • Asia
  • Black
  • Uncoated
  • 01BO803

12C27

12C27 is a classic Swedish Sandvik steel used for many outdoor knives and very popular with French manufacturers like Robert David. Sometimes, 12C27 is used for mass-produced razor blades. Depending on the heat treatment, its hardness can be above or below 440C.

G10

G10 is a so-called glass fiber reinforced plastic (GRP for short) used for the mass production of handles but also for blades and even entire knives.

As a glass fiber reinforced plastic, G10 is a composite material. This type of material consists of at least two base materials. The special feature of composite materials is that the finished composite still retains the individual structures of the base materials. This means that the base materials also keep their own chemical and physical properties. Compared to traditional materials, composite materials are lighter and more durable.They were first used in those areas and industries in which weight reduction is a priority, such as aircraft or race car construction.

In recent years, however, composite materials have also been used for other products, including knives. The base materials used for G10 are glass fibers and epoxy resin. Glass fibers are produced by melting glass and extruding fine filaments from the melt. Glass fibers are highly resistant to chemical materials and physical influences, which makes them weatherproof and age-resistant. They are also incombustible. In addition, glass fibers possess a high tensile modulus, which means that they are relatively sturdy. Epoxy resin is a synthetic resin that can be cured to form a plastic material.

Cured epoxy resin is extremely hard and strong but at the same time considerably lighter than metals with comparable properties. To produce G10, a glass fiber matrix, i.e. a woven glass fiber structure, is embedded in epoxy resin. The two materials are shaped and cured together. The curing process permanently bonds the glass fiber matrix to the epoxy resin. The glass fibers make the resulting fiber/plastic composite very sturdy and durable, while the epoxy resin makes the material lightweight. Handles, blades or entire knives made from G10 are often black or charcoal gray; handles made from this material often have a rough surface.

Slipjoint

The slipjoint is a locking mechanism for folding knives. Slipjoint knives do not possess a mechanical locking mechanism. Instead, the open blade is locked only by means of a spring attached to the end of the spine. Slipjoints are one of the most common locking mechanisms for folding knives.

A slipjoint has a small spring at the back end of the spine that keeps the open blade in place. The knife is closed by putting pressure on the spine of the blade to overcome the resistance of the spring holding the blade in place. Once the spring no longer holds the blade, it can be closed very easily. Unlike other locking mechanisms, a slipjoint is not actually locking the blade, which means there is a heightened risk that the blade might close as it comes in contact with a hard object. For knives with this locking mechanism it is of vital importance that all parts are firmly and securely fitted together.

The slipjoint is regarded as the classic locking mechanism for folding knives. Before the other locking mechanisms were invented, e.g. the backlock or the linerlock, just about all folding knives were equipped with a slipjoint. This is the main reason why slipjoint knives remind many knife collectors of "grandpa's pocketknife". A pocketknife carried by people of our grandfathers' generation would have had a simple slipjoint mechanism.

Folding knives with multiple blades are one of the main applications of slipjoints, because this locking mechanism allows for a parallel arrangement of several folding blades. Another major reason for the widespread use of slipjoints is the fact that many countries have strict rules and regulations for carrying one-handed knives with a locking blade. Here, knives with a slipjoint mechanism are a better – and legal – alternative.